for each age is a dream that is dying,

or one that is coming to birth

61 notes

quotesfromromancenovels:

“You’re right,” Free said, shutting her eyes.

He blinked and sat back, cocking his head. “What did you say?”

“I said you were right,” Free repeated. “You’re right about all of that. If history is any guide, it will take years—decades, perhaps—before women get the vote. As for the rest of it, I imagine that any woman who manages to stand out will be a target for abuse. She always is.”

His eyes crinkled in confusion.

“What I don’t understand is why you think you need to lecture me about this all. I run a newspaper for women. Do you imagine that nobody has ever written to me to explain precisely what you just said?”

He frowned. “Well.”

“Do you suppose I’ve never been told that I’m upset because I am menstruating? That I would calm down if only some man would put a child in my belly? Usually, the person writing offers to help out with that very task.” She swallowed bile in memory. “Shall I tell you what someone painted on my door one midnight? Or do you want to read the letters I receive?” Free wrapped her arms around herself. “I am here, on the floor of my press, because I told a man I wouldn’t bed him, and so he burned my house down. So, yes, Edward. I know the obstacles women face. I know them better than you ever will.”

He exhaled harshly. “God, Free.”

“Do you think I don’t know that the only tool I have is my thimble? I’m the one wielding it. I know. There are days I stare out at the Thames and wish I could stop bailing.” Her voice dropped. “My arms are tired, and there’s so much water that I’m afraid it’ll pull me under. But do you know why I keep going?”

He reached out and touched her chin. “That’s the one thing I can’t figure out. You don’t seem stupid; why do you persist?”

She lifted her face to his. “Because I’m not trying to empty the Thames.” Silence met this. “Look at the tasks you listed, the ones you think are impossible. You want men to give women the right to vote. You want men to think of women as equals, rather than as lesser animals who go around spewing illogic between our menstrual cycles.” He still wasn’t saying anything. “All your tasks are about men,” she told him. “And if you haven’t noticed, this is a newspaper for women.”

—Courtney Milan, The Suffragette Scandal

(via lettersfromtitan)

3,618 notes

alicexz:

[ Matching Parts ] by toerning.
CAN I JUST SAY THAT THIS IS ONE OF MY FAVORITE HTTYD FANART PIECES EVER. I’ll just quote her artist description:

“There’s this one moment at the end of this movie, when Toothless is helping Hiccup hobble to the door and then his busted tail sweeps into frame… The first time I saw it, my reaction to the movie went from “this is the best thing that’s ever happened to me” to “this is the best thing that’s ever happened to animation.”

^ YES YES YES YES omg the chills that ran down my spine that scene…. I watched every Toothless/Hiccup scene like four times yesterday… I. REGRET. NOTHING. asdafsafsafffff the obsession is taking over me perfect relationship is perfect.

alicexz:

[ Matching Parts ] by toerning.

CAN I JUST SAY THAT THIS IS ONE OF MY FAVORITE HTTYD FANART PIECES EVER. I’ll just quote her artist description:

“There’s this one moment at the end of this movie, when Toothless is helping Hiccup hobble to the door and then his busted tail sweeps into frame… The first time I saw it, my reaction to the movie went from “this is the best thing that’s ever happened to me” to “this is the best thing that’s ever happened to animation.”
^ YES YES YES YES omg the chills that ran down my spine that scene…. I watched every Toothless/Hiccup scene like four times yesterday… I. REGRET. NOTHING. asdafsafsafffff the obsession is taking over me perfect relationship is perfect.

(via burdge)

Filed under how to train your dragon yes that is the moment I knew I was going to have to rewatch this movie many many times

2,101 notes

But it turned out that Joan was really, uncannily good at leading an army. She had skills that no female person who’d spent her life tending house — the thing she was best at, she later told a room full of men, was sewing — had any reason to possess. “She was quite innocent, unless it be in warfare,” says the former roommate. “She rode on horseback and handled the lance like the best of the knights, and the soldiers marveled.” Uh, yeah: I’ll bet they did.

So it turned out she was good, and you all know this part of the story. She was very good at it, despite the fact that she was initially excluded from the important meetings, and despite the fact that she had no training, and despite the fact that she was a woman and people weren’t supposed to listen to those — “harlot,” was a common theory among the English at the time, because what would a woman be doing in the army unless was sleeping with all of the soldiers; one English soldier straight-up laughed at the idea of “surrendering to a woman” — and despite the fact that her whole authority was based on telling people that she had magic powers. She took an arrow in the neck, in the middle of a battle, and kept fighting. If you want to get a sense of what actually made it possible for her to get from a kitchen in the middle of nowhere, to standing in front of the King and making her case, to a leadership position in the military, to leading this one particular hopeless lost cause of a battle, the Siege of Orleans, and winning it, this is instructive. If you want to get a sense of the sheer willpower driving this woman, think about being just a little female teenager from nowhere with no military training, whose biggest talent was sewing, shoved into chaotic, close-range, hugely violent battle, and about what it would take for you not to freak the fuck out at this point, what it would take to keep fighting with an arrow in your neck.
Running Towards The Gunshots: A Few Words About Joan of Arc (via gatheringbones)

(Source: tigerbeatdown.com, via into-the-weeds)

Filed under joan of arc

780 notes

An African-American welfare-dependent mother of three told me this story about the birth of her son with Down syndrome. She had been planning to put the newborn up for adoption, a decision she had reached shortly before his birth, due to the domestic stress and violence with which she was living. When the baby was born and diagnosed, a white social worker came to see her about placing the child. The mother asked what would become of her baby and was told, ‘We’ll probably find a rural farm family to take him.’ ‘Then what?’ she queried. ‘He’ll grow up outside, knowing about crops and animals,’ was the reply. ‘Then what,’ the mother repeated. ‘Maybe he’ll even grow up to work on that farm,’ the social worker replied. ‘Sounds like slavery to me,’ answered the mother, who decided to take her baby home. This imagery and its legacy contrast strongly with the stories many white mothers tell, in which they fantasize a peaceful, rural life ‘in nature’ as the perfect placement for their children with Down syndrome.

in Testing Women, Testing the Fetus: The Social Impact of Amniocentesis in America by Rayna Rapp, p. 271. 

This paragraph like, knocked the wind out of me. 

(via this-reading-by-lightning)

(via littlemissmutant)

Filed under ableism racism